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Mount Stirling - Victoria

sunny 20 °C

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Making the most of the beautiful scenery, I headed up to Mount Stirling for a day of alpine walking with my trusty rusty truck
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Along the way I passed several huts,
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mostly used by the local schools for educational trips
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Mount Stirling is 1,749m above sea level. Looking back down to Mansfield and the Kings Country it feels high!
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Although this sign didn't seem to apply in the summer, it highlights just how remote the trails can be
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The view from the top boasts 360degrees of the surrounding mountain ranges.
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Foremost is the view of Mount Buller to the South, where you can see the village, north side ski runs and terrain from a different angle.
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The false summit, home of the 500 year old snow gum compliments the scene giving Mount Stirling the appearance of a saddle, with a well defined tree-line from afar.
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However, the evidence of passed fires is obvious.
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About 30 million years ago lava flows formed a layer of Basalt, seen today as a basalt cap upon which the Mt Buller village is built. A long period of erosions has left the present-day landscape characterised by a high open plateau and some sharp peaks, bounded by sharp ridges and deep sheltered valleys.
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Much of Mt Stirling consists of granite formed during the Devonian period, about 370 to 400 million years ago.

Alpine and subalpine environments, which are defined as regularly experiencing persistent snow, occupy approxomiately 0.15% of Australia. Many of the plants and animals that occupy the alpine and subalpine environments are not found anywhere else.
Thankfully, having discovered on the summit that my lunch (a pie left by the previous inhabitant of the shed) was mouldy, I found some yummy blackberries to keep me going
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Cross-country skiing at Mt Stirling became popular in the late 1970's. Logging roads were cleared in the winter, so enthusiasts would drive as far as possible and ski from the snowline.
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In summer, it looks like it'd be a great place for mountain biking
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In1982 Mt Stirling was declared an Alpine resort, and today employs a team of full-time volunteer winter ski patrollers. There are over 70km of ski trails.

Much of the forest in the sub-alpine region is re-growth forest of Alpine Ash, changing to Snow Gums in the higher areas.
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Many of these gums above the snow line may be hundreds of years old. Alpine plants and animals have evolved to survive the extremes of their environment - low temperatures, high winds, snow cover for long periods, and seasonal inundation.
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The trail was varied, due to the differences in altitude, but Wombat's Wander was particularly pleasant
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not that I saw any wombats!
I wouldn't want to guess what size monster has munched on this tree though
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I did come across this feisty fella though
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On the way home, I took a detour to investigate 'Sheepyard Flat' and came across my first sight of wild kangeroos
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Though the residents of this house probably don't look at them so favourably
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A little closer to home and the sun was setting over Mansfield
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Anther top day out
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Posted by charlystyles 13:52 Archived in Australia

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