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Kiama Coast Walk - NSW

sunny

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I caught the train up to Minnamurra and walked the 13miles back.
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I was taken about by the ticket machine on the platform - never seen so many buttons
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The first section of the Kiama Coast Walk leaves the mouth of the Minnamurra River and heads south through reserves and streetscapes to the Kiama Visitor Centre at Blowhole Point.
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The Kiama coast Walk starts at the mouth of the Minnamurra River and heads south through reserves and streetscapes to Blowhole Point.
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The catchment for the Minnamurra River covers almost half of the Kiama Municipality. A maze of little creeks and bogs feed into the river. the river travels through Minnamurra Rainforest and Jamberoo Valley.
The estuary spills out to the sea where the eucalypt and banksia forest on the spit holding the sand in place and protecting the river and houses from the force of the ocean.
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Across the tidal river mouth, you can see the secluded stretch of Mystics Beach.

Gerringong Cemetery
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Originally dedicated in July 1863, this cemetery displays unique designs and craftsmanship in the range of headstones dating from the late nineteenth century. Early graves run east to west facing the spectacular coastline.
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Cathedral Rocks
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This distinctive latite rock formation has lured sightseers since 1820.
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The rocks are remnants of the edge of a lava flow that has been eroded by the sea. The latite, commonly known as columnar basalt, owes its name to the characteristic vertical columns that are formed during the unique cooling process of this type of lava.
The below photo is courtesy of Gary P Hayes, and shows the rocks at their best.
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Bombo Beach
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The route was made more challenging due to various footpath closures, mostly due to bridge and road work
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Boneyard
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Bombo Headland or 'the Boneyard' was once a plentiful place where the Dharawal and other Aboriginal groups gathered to catch and collect marine life.
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With the onset of colonisation, the headland was stripped of vegetation and became a loading dock for the blue metal industry. While middens remain here, sadly decades of quarrying destroyed most of the remnants of Aboriginal culture and history.
After a substantial fight by a local activist group to save the headland from further quarrying, it was declared a State Park in 1974.
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Kendall's Beach
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Surf Beach
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Bombo Headland Quarry
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The volcanic rock of the Kiama district, latite, was initially used for fences and buildings.
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As the roads, tramways and railways of New South Wales rapidly expanded, the demand for the crushes latite (blue metal) created employment and industry in the developing community.
With the booming trade in blue metal, quarries opened up at sites outside Kiama such a Bombo.
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A jetty was completed at Bombo in 1882 and steam powered crushing machines installed at the quarry. In the early days many of the quarry workers at Bombo lived in tents.
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Clouds of dust regularly shrouded the camp in a gritty haze. A number of fatal accident in the first few years and the reputation of the sole drinking establishment gave the place a bad name.
If you can see me in the image below, you'll see how big the rocks are.
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The blue metal industry remained the main employer in the district until the 1960's.
The remnants are spectacular - and very popular with location scouts.
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King of The Boneyard
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Cameron Boyd was known to many as the 'King of the Boneyard'. His passion for surfing, nature and the local community combined with a strong, steadfast character earned him enormous respect
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Cameron was a regular surfer at Bombo and The Boneyard and his disposition was such that he spent almost as much time watching, assessing and chatting about the surf as he did in it. This wealth of knowledge was generously shared.
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Cameron is also known to have performed many ocean rescues at The Boneyard and nearby surfing locations averting tragedy.
I work to live but live to surf.

Kiama Harbour Boat
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Inquisitive Pelicans
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Kiama Beach
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Kiama Lighthouse
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The Kiama Lighthouse was completed in 1887. It was designed by the Colonial Architects' Office by Edwards Moriarty. The light had to be imported from England and the completion of the structure was the cause of much celebration.
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Kiama Pool
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Kiama Blow Hole
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The Kiama Headland is composed of volcanic rock called latite. A volcanic extrusion, known as a dyke, cuts through the latite. The dyke is composed of a softer rock cdalle basalt. Over millions of years the softer basalt has eroded faster than the latite creating a tunnel under the headland. Eventually part of the headland collapsed creating the Kiama Blow Hole.
As each wave surges through the tunnel, air is compressed in the rear chamber building tremendous pressure. As waves subside, pressure in the chamber releases forcing the trapped water up the blow hole with a loud 'whoomp'!

Black Beach
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Interesting sign...
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Little Blow Hole
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Little by name, yet often grander by nature.
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The best time to experience the Little Blow Hole is when the wind is blowing from the northeast.

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I started the route form the south, but was cut of by a lagoon that was flowing into the sea after all the rain.
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Werri Beach
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The rocks even have a spa!
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This overlooks the short section of the walk shown above
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The walk was from the furthest point in the picture below
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I spent a lot of time mesmerised by the rainbows created on the wave spray
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A great walk along another part of the east coast
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Posted by charlystyles 13:13 Archived in Australia Tagged kiama_coastal_walk

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